A national benchmark in
Educational excellence through integration of the arts

Posts Written By: josh

History Day 2016

History Day 2016

On Thursday, January 21, 7th grade students participated in the first ever History Day competition on ArtSpace Campus.  Students chose to present their History research through a variety of media including

7th Graders Ronin and Logan exhibit their research.

7th Graders Ronin and Logan exhibit their research.

documentaries, exhibits, websites, and research papers.  

The National History Day program allows students to research topics that they are passionate about and present their work in a wide range of formats. Students gain research skills, learn to properly cite sources, and develop the ability to manage time during a long-term project.

17  students will be continuing on to the regional competition in Cullowhee on March 19th.  We look forward to watching them compete and wish them luck!

T-shirts, designed by an ArtSpace student, were generously donated for the event by Dr. Jojo Yonce of Asheville Brain Training.  

Flood Recovery Underway – How YOU Can Help!

Flood Recovery Underway – How YOU Can Help!

Early on the morning of December 29, ArtSpace Charter School experienced a devastating flood event.  Heavy rains collapsed the bank next to our building and the resulting mudslide caused massive damage to the interior of the

Flooding hit nearly every room in the school.

Flooding hit nearly every room in the school.

school.

We have had wonderful support from our community, but we are facing a high deductible ($25,000) for our insurance and significant repair costs that could reach into the hundreds of thousands of dollars in order to remedy the situation.  If you would like to support please visit:

https://www.youcaring.com/artspace-charter-school-495482

 

Likewise, if you would rather mail a check, please put “Flood Recovery” in the memo line and send checks to:

Flooding in the theater.

Flooding in the theater.

ArtSpace Charter School

2030 US Hwy 70

Swannanoa, NC 28778

 

Thank you for your help!

Coming Soon To A Theater Near You!

Coming Soon To A Theater Near You!

SWANNANOA, NC- The ArtSpace stage will be filled with exciting performances, informances and special events throughout December and January!  This week is the 4th Annual Medieval Faire hosted by ArtSpace 6th graders.This is not a traditional performance; attendees will have the chance to wander the Faire to learn about “products and services” available during the Middle Ages.  Students will also present traditional mystery plays, choral music, and traditional social dances from the time period.  

6th graders prepare for their Medieval Faire performance.

6th graders prepare for their Medieval Faire performance.

Next week on Wednesday, December 16th, middle school students will present the Winter Arts Festival.  This night of entertainment will include performances from the 6th and 7th/8th grade bands under the direction of Ms. Meg Boerner, movies created by students in technology with Mr. Steve, and dance performances choreographed under the guidance of Ms. Mary.  This diverse group of  performances will highlight the skills and arts understanding the students have developed in their specific art forms over the past two quarters.  There will be a school performance at 2 PM and an evening performance at 6:00 PM.

In January, after winter break, the action ramps up again with a puppet performance created by the 7th and 8th grade drama elective.  Students have created big puppets and written stories to perform for the kindergarten- 5th grade classes at ArtSpace.  This performance is scheduled for Wednesday, January 13th.

The next day, January 14th, 3rd grade will host the 12th Annual Dinner Party Project.  This is a project inspired by a collaborative art piece created in the late 60’s and 70’s with the same name.  Third graders have researched an

Third graders prepare their plates for The Dinner Party.

Third graders prepare their plates for The Dinner Party.

individual who has had an impact on the world in some way through philanthropy, invention, etc.  They have used this research to create table place settings to represent this person.  On Thursday, January 14th the dinner table will be set and 3rd graders will present monologues as the person they researched.  The Dinner Party Project is one of the oldest event traditions at ArtSpace and one well-worth experiencing.

On that day, too, the school will be holding Musical auditions for students interested in participating in this year’s musical GO DOG GO!  It is shaping up to be a busy winter in the theater and we are excited to collaborate witho our students to create these wonderful learning opportunities.

Cold and Flu Season is Here

Cold and Flu Season is Here

 

Like in all public schools during the late fall and winter, children begin to spend more time inside due to inclement weather and limited daylight hours.  The increased time in close quarters with others means that we share more than just space!  Colds, the flu, and other bugs tend to thrive and spread fast at this time of year.

Sometimes it is hard to determine when to keep a child at home.  The following are the ArtSpace guidelines as outlined in the Parent-Student Handbook:

*** Please Use These Guidelines When Determining When To Keep Your Child Home***

  • Vomiting and/or Diarrhea in previous 24 hours
  • Temperature 100 degrees or higher (must be kept home until fever free for 24 hours)
  • Any suspicious rash must be seen by a physician.  Child may return to school only with a medical doctor’s note deeming the rash to be non-contagious.
  • Illness that prevents your child from participating comfortably in classroom or program activities.  
  • Pink eye with discharge, until seen by a medical doctor.  A note must be provided stating when the child may return to school.
  • Strep Throat, until 24 hours after medication has started.
  • Head lice, until morning after first treatment and lice/nit free.
  • Scabies, until afer treatment is completed.
  • Chicken Pox, after 6th day of onset of rash or sooner if all sores are dried and crusted.
  • Any communicable disease deemed by the Executive Director to require doctor approval to return to school
  • Child displays any of the following:
      • Lethargy (Lifelessness)
      • Irritability
      • Persistent crying, difficulty breathing, or other signs of severe illness.

THANK YOU FOR HELPING KEEP THE ARTSPACE COMMUNITY HEALTHY!

The following note is from local Naturopath and ArtSpace parent, Rebecca Word.  Rebecca serves on the ArtSpace Health and Wellness Committee and offers the following to help keep kids from catching illnesses.

Disclaimer: The following is not intended to diagnose, treat or individually prescribe for any person.  If in doubt consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner.

Hi ArtSpace families,

We all get a little antsy when cold and flu season rolls around, but there are really useful preventive strategies you can rely on. Here are a few of many:

  • Most importantly, a decrease of refined sugars and carbohydrates is essential (yes,

all that Halloween candy); these foods really hamper immune function. Encourage

children to eat a rainbow…not skittles…but fruits and veggies. Let them see you do

the same

  • Kids like yummy stuff…elderberry syrup is a wonderful remedy for wintertime and

offers antioxidants, potassium, beta-carotene, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin C. For children under 2, add the syrup to hot water to kill any microbes in the honey.

    • You can stir into tea as well. Very tasty. You can purchase it of course, but here’s a super easy and inexpensive recipe from Mountain Rose Herbs:
      • ½ cup dried organic Elderberries
      • 3 cups water

      • 1 cup raw local honey

      • 1 organic cinnamon stick
      • 3 organic Cloves
      • a pinch of dried organic ginger root

Place berries, water, and spices in a saucepan. Bring to a gentle boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 30 minutes. Smash the berries to release remaining juice and strain the mixture. Cool and stir in honey. Will last for 2-3 months stored in the fridge.  Kids age 2 and up: take 1-2 Tb/day for prevention; triple this if feeling blah (will also clear digestive tract!)

If your little one does start to come down with something increase the elderberry syrup as mentioned above and you can add vitamin C, zinc and vitamin A to assist in battling the bug. For children ages 5-12 dosages are as follows: 500 mg vitamin C 2- 3 times per day, zinc 15-30 mg/day and vitamin A can be used 25,000 iu twice per day FOR THREE DAYS ONLY. The vitamin A can accumulate in the liver and so at that dosage should be used short term only, but it is an awesome anti-viral.

Enjoy the late fall and winter weather. Here’s to your health!

Rebecca R. Word, ND

www.blueridgenaturopath.com

 

CAN’D AID Foundation and Steep Canyon Rangers at ArtSpace!

CAN’D AID Foundation and Steep Canyon Rangers at ArtSpace!

On November 18th, ArtSpace will benefit from a gift from Oskar Blues Brewery’s CAN’d AID Foundation.  The foundation will be presenting ArtSpace with a class set of guitars and hosting a 90 minute workshop with members

Steep Canyon Ranger multi-instrumentalist, Mike Ashworth.

Steep Canyon Ranger multi-instrumentalist, Mike Ashworth.

of the Grammy Award winning bluegrass band Steep Canyon Rangers.  A select group of music students at ArtSpace will take part in a 90 minute music workshop with three members of the band — Nicky Sanders (fiddle), Graham Sharp (banjo), and Mike Ashworth (percussion and guitar).  The workshops are an opportunity for

Banjo player, Graham Sharp.

Banjo player, Graham Sharp.

these students to get a glimpse of what it takes to become a nationally recognized professional musician.  Students were selected for their interest in the instruments featured in the workshop and for their exhibition of 21st century college and career readiness skills in music and band classes.

Many families at ArtSpace struggle to provide instruments for their students.  Meg Boerner, ArtSpace music teacher said, “We have a great desire within our student body to sing, play and perform and frequently they express wanting to learn guitar.  This is an excellent addition to the school’s instrument library and will allow for many more students to study an instrument and get all of the benefits that the serious study of music

Fiddle player, Nicky Sanders.

Fiddle player, Nicky Sanders.

provides.”

A class set of guitars will bring access to instruments for hundreds of students and shape the school’s music program for years to come.  A large body of research has shown that increased exposure and participation in the arts increases student achievement resulting in higher graduation rates and test scores.    

Learn more about the CAN’d AID foundation here and more about the partnership between CAN’D AID and Steep Canyon Rangers by visiting here.

Collaboration: The Art Of Working Together

Collaboration:  The Art Of Working Together

This is the third part in a series on the 4 C’s of 21st Century Skills – Creativity, Critical Thinking, Collaboration and Communication – by long-time arts integration specialist, “Capt.” Josh Batenhorst – Enterprise and Development Director at ArtSpace Charter School, a K-8 public charter school of 400 students in Swannanoa, NC.

Of the 4C’s, “Collaboration” is probably the most important skill for students to develop in order to find success in their professional life.  This summer, The American Journal of Public Health published a study that found that “pro-social” skills – the ability to share, cooperate, and resolve conflicts with peers, – were a predictor of success for students 15-20 years into the future!  In short, it is absolutely imperative students learn to work on a team.  Let’s consider how the arts help develop collaboration skills in students.

The performing arts require obvious collaboration.

The performing arts require obvious collaboration.

First of all, the arts teach collaboration by giving students the opportunity to be a part of a team.  A band is not a band if it is just one instrument (One-man bands excluded!).  Theatre, music and dance are almost always done in tandem with a group of other performers (See a great ArtSpace example here).  Even one person shows and solo artists must be a part of a large support crew that takes care of direction and production elements.  Inclusion in performing arts groups teaches children how to value others’ efforts and how to develop and maintain relationships while accomplishing a common goal.

Ms. Annabell leads her class in a collaborative analysis  of a visual art piece by Henri Rousseau.

Ms. Annabell leads her class in a collaborative analysis of a visual art piece by Henri Rousseau.

But what about visual art? Art projects tend to strike me as individual accomplishments, not “team sports.”  I tend to think of Picasso, not Picasso & Company.  

Since I am not a visual artist myself, I took this question to a number of members of the ArtSpace staff who have significant experience in the visual arts:  2nd grade teacher, Ms. Annabell Lisa, 7/8th grade science teacher, Mr. Nick Rogowski, and 5th grade Science/Math teacher, Marni Flanigan.

Annabell (2nd Grade): “Collaborating on a piece can be very hard in visual art. Nevertheless, we do it in the classroom all of the time.  For example, today we are each making colored paper that we will use for an all-class project that coincides with our study of Matisse.  The key is giving the students some time to do individual work, and then time to also work collaboratively.”

A group art piece created by 2nd graders during their study of Matisse - "Painting With Scissors."

A group art piece created by 2nd graders during their study of Matisse – “Painting With Scissors.”

When asked about how she collaborates to create her own art she said, “Sometimes it can be as simple as finding the time resources and support to do it.  As a mother of a pre-school age child, I may not collaborate with another artist, but I definitely use support to help balance everything.  However, I collaborate on art work with my students a lot.  They often build off of my ideas and I build off of theirs.”  

Nick (7/8th grade):  “Actually, I have collaborated with my wife (artist and ArtSpace parent Mae Creadick) on several pieces.  Sometimes she will draw a piece for a specific print, since that is her specialty.  

Mr. Nick prepares 7th grade science students for their next visual art project.

Mr. Nick prepares 7th grade science students for their next visual art project.

Then, I may carve a lino-cut, since that is my area of skill, in order to make the print.  In fact, while we’re talking about prints, the printer often gets left out as being valuable in the art making process, but a bad print can be really bad, while a great print is a work of art in itself.”

Ms. Marni (5th grade):  “Recently we completed a visual art/science project that was very collaborative (You can see more  about that project here).  Students studied different body systems and then created life size replications of those systems.  They also created songs and dances that reinforced the learning.”

Completed 5th grade body systems "life size" art work.

Completed 5th grade body systems “life size” art work.

ArtSpace is fortunate to have a number of visual artists on staff to help students learn to build collaboration skills in all of the art forms – even the ones that don’t seem like an obvious fit.  Students who learn to collaborate are set up for success, and they are learning to do it through all of the arts at ArtSpace!

Welcome To My Office – by Ms. Adina

Welcome To My Office – by Ms. Adina

Adina Arden-Cooper is a National Board Certified Teacher and Licensed Professional Counselor who leads our school’s character education and counseling programs.  From time to time, Ms. Adina will be offering insights about the role emotional well-being and character education play in students’ lives and the ArtSpace Community.  Her first “guest post” is below.

Welcome! I’d like to take a minute to introduce myself. My name is Ms. Adina and I am the School Counselor at ArtSpace. My job is to tend to the social and emotional education and well-being of all ArtSpace students. This happens in a variety of ways, from coordinating school-wide programs such as bully prevention (PULSE) to individual counseling, with a range responsibilities in between.

My office door is plastered with notes, cards and drawings made for me by students. They say things like, “thank you for helping me,” “you make life better,” “you’re awesome” and “I love you.” These words of kindness and gratitude are the first thing I see every morning and serve as an amazing reminder of how blessed I am to do this work. No matter how hard things get sometimes (and boy do they get hard!) it is all worth it to know that I’m making a difference in the lives of students.

As a counselor, I am entrusted with the responsibility of helping students and families cope with some very personal challenges. I feel honored to bear witness to areas of weakness and vulnerability as well as those of strength and success. I’ve been doing this work for about fifteen years now and I continue to be moved and amazed by people’s stories. It is a humbling experience.

Ms. Adina discusses an issue with a student.

Ms. Adina discusses an issue with a student.

I realize that counseling can be intimidating. It’s hard to open up about emotional challenges. There’s also a lot of stigma associated with counseling. Some feel ashamed to admit they are struggling or need support. Some people think it means they’re “crazy” or have “issues;” that there is something wrong with them. But the fact of the matter is that EVERYONE can benefit from some extra support once in a while. Being proactive about addressing social or emotional hurdles is tremendously helpful for personal growth and development. If kids can learn effective strategies for coping with stress, managing their emotions and developing strong relationships, they will achieve better academic success. Ultimately, they will grow into healthier, happier adults.

It’s important to realize though that counselors cannot fix things or make problems disappear. We serve as supportive guides, but in order for the process to be effective, individuals have to participate and work toward their own well-being. This means students and families must confront their obstacles and actively navigate around them. Know that I’m here to be a resource, to educate and to help to the best of my ability, without judgment or blame.

My hope is that when people step into my office, they feel a sense of calm and comfort. I strive to create a safe and welcoming space for all, regardless of whatever has brought them in. Thank you for visiting today. I look forward to sharing more about my role and the amazing programs we have to support and nurture children here at ArtSpace!

 

 

Coming Soon To A Theater Near You!

Coming Soon To A Theater Near You!

SWANNANOA, NC – The ArtSpace Stage has some exciting theatre and multi-media productions coming in October that promise to engage, educate, and entertain.  Coming next week, on October 8, the 7/8th grade Theatre Arts elective will present S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders.  This play is a one hour version of the classic young adult novel

Make plans now to see The Outsiders!

Make plans now to see The Outsiders!

chronicling the tale of Ponyboy Curtis, his brothers, and the rivalry between street gangs the Greasers and the Socs.  Addressing the important social issues of gangs, violence, and class struggle, the play is an opportunity for students to think deeply about the lasting consequences of momentary decisions.  “The play shows that no matter how much money you have,” says 8th grader Daniel Stearns, “you still have to deal with stress and tragedy.”  The play will be presented at 10:00 AM for school audiences and 6:00 PM for the community.  Please note that some of the play’s themes may not be suitable for younger audiences.

Next up, on Wednesday, October 14, the sixth grade will present their annual exploration of the Greeks and Homer’s Odyssey with their production Greek Lightning!  This show uses parodies of music from the musicals Grease and A Chorus Line to explore the tale of Odysseus and his treacherous journey home from the Trojan War as he tries to be reunited with his wife Penelope.  “This is the third time we have presented this version of The Odyssey,” said sixth grade language arts/social studies teacher John Hall, “It was something (former theatre teacher) Mr. Josh and I wrote several years ago and I think the students really enjoy it.”   

“It is really fun!  My favorite part are the songs because they are fun and help you remember the story,” said Chloe Raines, sixth grader.  

ArtSpace student, Kai’ana Ghassabian, added, “We’ve been studying it in pretty much every class – music, drama, theatre and social studies.  We sing the songs in (science/math teacher) Ms. Lyn’s class too.  They get stuck in your head.”

“What was really fun was getting to choreograph the dance for the song One.” said Emile Rizzo-Banks.  “It was more fun to do that than to just do what the teacher asked us to do.  (Dance teacher) Ms. Mary asked us what our ideas were, we would show her, and she would help us put it together to tell the story.”

The school show of Greek Lightning is at 2:00 PM, Wednesday October 14, and the community show is at 6:00 that same night.

5th grade students collaborate on their art/science projects.

5th grade students collaborate on their art/science projects.

Finally, on Wednesday, October 21, students from the fifth grade will present a multi-media show about the human body systems.  Students have been studying the different systems of human anatomy.  As collaborative teams they create life-size drawings of the various systems during their science class, write songs in music about the systems that include vocabulary from the science curriculum, and choreograph dances that illustrate how each system supports the body.  “We study about the systems and then work together in all of the classes to put together songs and dances and art.  Not every group has the same system, but we learn about the other systems from each other,” said fifth grader Autumn Young.  

A finished work.  That project takes guts!

A finished work. That project takes guts!

The fifth grade body system performances are at 2 PM and 6 PM on Wednesday, October 21.

 

Grandparents Day and Community Cookout

Grandparents Day and Community Cookout

SWANNANOA, NC – ArtSpace’s inaugural Grandparents Day and 2nd annual Fall Community Cookout were met with great enthusiasm on September 11, 2015.  Over 140 Grandparents showed up for the day.  Grandparents were treated to lunch with their students, a tour of the school and an “expert panel” of ArtSpace students.  “The response was overwhelming!  It was wonderful to have the children’s extended family in the school,” said Ms. Lori Cozzi, the school’s Executive Director.

Grandparents participate in hands-on activities in Ms. Claire's first grade.

Grandparents participate in hands-on activities in Ms. Claire’s first grade.

After the Grandparents Day festivities concluded, the school hosted its 2nd annual Fall Community Cookout.  Hundreds of ArtSpace students, teachers, parents and staff crowded the field over the course of the the three hour event.  Hundreds of hot dogs were gobbled while families got to know each other and children played on the field.  

Grandparents gather for an "expert panel."

Grandparents gather for an “expert panel.”

The day also marked the opening of the 2nd ACT ArtSpace Community Thrift Store!  The store is now up and running:  Wednesday through Saturday, 11 AM to 6 PM.  The store is accepting donations and is looking for volunteers.

Community members gather in the shade for the cookout.

Community members gather in the shade for the cookout.

 

Charlotte’s Web: 2nd Grade Arts Integration

Charlotte’s Web: 2nd Grade Arts Integration

As part of their 2nd grade arts integrated programming, Ms. Ali and Ms. Annabell’s second grade classes study the E.B. White classic, Charlotte’s Web.  While the students experience the book during “read-aloud” time, their study of the concepts of the book goes well beyond hearing about the book.  Charlotte’s Web serves as a springboard for learning in science, social studies, drama, and visual art.  

IMG_1627

Charlotte’s Web ties in directly to our standards & themes,” says Ms. Ali. “First, there are seasonal changes: Wilbur is born in Spring, as are the other barnyard babies. They go through the lazy days of summer and into Autumn, which is both County fair time and the time for Charlotte to prepare her egg sac (and then to die). There’s another direct science connection: life-cycles.  Come Spring again, Charlotte’s babies hatch. BTW, we’re always at the Fair part of the book right around when the Mountain State Fair is happening, which leads to another intrinsic tie-in: Community. The book allows us to teach about the communities of Fern’s family, the farm community, the barnyard community, while we are building our classroom community and teaching the kids about the school community (and the Four Pillars), and our broader Buncombe County community.”

Ms. Ali's class shows their finished products.

Ms. Ali’s class shows their finished products.

Parent volunteers helped the students to create their sculptures.  Once the sculptures were dry, the students in Ms. Ali’s class used tempera paint to give their creations color, while Ms. Annabell’s students used colored tissue paper.  To finish the products, students used Modge Podge to help harden and shine the exterior.
This arts integrated project is an example of the kinds of hands-on learning occurring every day at ArtSpace.  It capitalized on the students’ enthusiasm for their book, taught them new art techniques, and allowed them to express ideas about the characters in the book and their learning by adding expression, color and shape to their sculptures.

Charlotte, Wilbur, and Templeton (from left to right).

Charlotte, Wilbur, and Templeton (from left to right).

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